2019 LEAP - Physics and Rocketry
Northwood School
At Northwood, students learn by doing – that’s the guiding principle for the school's L.E.A.P. Program, an experiential learning curriculum launched in 2017. Northwood faculty leverage individual expertise to craft week-long courses which immerse students in unique subjects. Students choose their L.E.A.P courses in the first trimester and then meet periodically throughout the year in preparation for L.E.A.P week in May.

L.E.A.P. courses take students and faculty out of the classroom for collaborative, first-hand experiences. Students work with experts in the field and are provided opportunities to explore compelling environments and complete ambitious projects resulting in skill development and confidence for future real-world challenges. The L.E.A.P. Showcase that caps the week allows students to share their adventures in learning with the school and local community.

Ready, Set, LEAP!

Each L.E.A.P. course propels students from theory to practice. Teachers guide participants through disciplines as diverse as fly fishing, circus arts, and geothermal energy. These courses give students the opportunity to take on projects and challenges in new settings, and use the information and skills provided by experts to achieve new objectives. The fresh learning perspective encourages student ownership and initiative. Ultimately, L.E.A.P. equips students to navigate complex subjects and tasks independently and successfully.

L.E.A.P. is a place to explore a passion or discover a new interest.

Learn • Engage • Apply • Perform

Physics and Rocketry
This course teaches students rocket science basics and computer modeling so they can imagine, design, build and launch rockets up to four inches in diameter and eight feet tall. Students at least 18 years old may earn their Level 1 certification. Participants will build and launch a model rocket from a kit, and design, construct, and launch a mid-power rocket. There will be a demonstration of various high-power rockets (flying up to 2,500 feet). The class will launch appropriate rockets during a school meeting time, offering commentary to demonstrate what they learned. From this experience, students will learn general problem-solving skills, rocket design components and how each affects performance (such as, stability, mass, drag, and thrust), computer modeling, and rocket construction techniques.
Led by Mr. Roy and Mr. B Runyon

ESSENTIAL QUESTION:
What factors impact rocket performance?

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We started our LEAP Rockets program with some ups and downs in the morning of day one!
The students launched the model rockets they built leading up to LEAP
Videos
Photos
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Ha ha! I see my son James, thanks for your information, l hope James could attend these activities more times, thanks again!
Unfortunately, a few were never to be seen again. Maybe they are still in orbit!?
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The students designed their mid-power rockets with RockSim (computer aided design software) and started cuttting out their fins in the afternoon of day one.
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Day two was dedicated to rocket construction with LOC Precision components.

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Day two ended with the rocket build well underway - infact, most are nearly done.
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Thank you Ben.    Looks like a fun adventure.
 We appreciate the effort you and Matt put in with the kids!
 Best regards

Day three was primarily devoted to a demonstration rocket launch with visiting expert - Howie Drukerman (L3)
Champlain Region Model Rocket Club (CRMRC) #643

Thank you, Art Leavitt

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That one landed in the woods. Don't worry, Ben will get it.
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Issue a NOTAM (NOtice to AirMen) and the planes are sure to show up!
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That's going be a long walk, especially with bad hips!
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We lost a rocket down there. In fact, there are several from the last few years. Fortunately, Mr. Runyon found (and retrieved from some height) the one lst this year.
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Day three concluded with the students finishing their rocket build (except shock cord mounts and rail buttons) or adding some some spray paint.

We are looking good for Friday's student rocket launch, if the weather holds out.

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Moose tracks. (Good ice cream!?)
I guess we weren't the only turkeys in the area.
Day Four
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Day four concluded with four rockets ready for tomorrow's launch. The prediction is 10% chance of rain, but winds are expected to blow at 15 to 20 mph with gusts to 30. We'll see what we can do.

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Andrew's RockSim file
Tiago's RockSim file
James' RockSim file
Gary's, Paul's, and Zheqi's RockSim file
Day Five was all about launching the students' rockets.
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Thanks to Chris' Rocket Supplies and Performance Hobbies for the Cesaroni motors.

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